Facts About Oklahoma Common Law Marriage

Oklahoma is among the few states that still recognize common law marriage, but it is a complicated issue that is not always easy to explain, except to say that just living together for a long time is not enough. The reality is that two people can live together for decades, but they are not considered to be married unless certain circumstances are met.

If you are involved in a committed relationship and you need clear legal guidance about your status, our Oklahoma City attorneys at the Taylor Law Firm, PLLC can help.

If You Think You Are Married, Then You May Be

One of the primary standards for determining common law marriage is whether you agreed to assume a marital relationship and held out to the public that you were married. If, for example, you were living with a significant other for a decade, but you made it clear to friends and family that you were not married, then you cannot prove a common law marriage. On the other hand, if you did represent yourselves to friends and family as being married, you may be able to prove a common law marriage so long as the relationship was exclusive. Filing joint income tax returns and carrying the other party as a dependent for health insurance purposes can also be used to prove a common law marriage.

As your lawyer, we can help you address the range of issues that are relevant to common law marriage, including:

If you are involved in a complex legal matter having to do with common law marriage, it is important to get clear, knowledgeable and experienced family law guidance. Our father-and-son team of attorneys offer more than 50 years of combined experience. We can help you take on these issues and fight for your rights under Oklahoma law.

Answering Complex Questions About Common Law Marriage

Did you file your tax returns jointly? Did you and your significant other share the same last name? Did you present yourself publicly as married? These are factors that will go straight to the heart of your common law status.

To get answers to difficult questions, call our office at 405-525-2232 and speak with an attorney. Or contact us online to schedule a free consultation.